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Table 2 Items for measuring each variable

From: Sustainable product purchase: does information about product sustainability on social media affect purchase behavior?

Construct Measurement item Reference
Sustainability-related information seeking (WSS) WS1: Regarding sustainability issues, I seek more information supporting my opinions.
WS2: Regarding sustainability issues, I seek more information supporting the other opinions
WS3: Regarding sustainability issues, I seek more information that offers a balanced view.
WS4: Regarding sustainability issues, I seek more opinions supporting my point of view.
WS5: Regarding sustainability issues, I seek more opinions supporting the other points of view.
Borah (2014)
Dependency on social media for sustainability-related information (DSM) Information available on social media helps me –
DSM1: decide whether to buy sustainable products/brands or not.
DSM2: decide which products/brands are sustainable and which are not.
DSM3: decide whether to buy a certain sustainable product/brand or not.
DSM4: know what sustainable products/brands make good impressions on others.
DSM5: decide what sustainable products/brands to buy.
DSM6: decide between different sustainable products/brands alternatives.
DSM7: choose the right sustainable product/brand.
Grant (1996)
Sustainability risk (SR) When I read negative statements by other users on social media about a certain product/brand with respect to its sustainability characteristics, I would likely suspect that –
SR1: the product/brand will not meet the desired sustainability criteria.
SR2: the product/ brand will not work properly with respect to sustainability requirements.
SR3: I would face negative consequences if I use this product/brand, because of social or environmental harm.
SR4: using the product/brand will negatively affect sustainability aspects (e.g., environment, work conditions, etc.)
SR5: using the product/brand would damage my reputation or image as a person who cares about sustainability.
Chen and Chang (2012)
Sustainability trust (ST) When I read positive statements by other users on social media about a certain product/brand with respect to its sustainability characteristics, I would likely think that –
ST1: the product/brand’s sustainability reputation is generally reliable.
ST2: the product/brand will work properly with respect to sustainability requirements.
ST3: the product/brand’s claims regarding sustainability are generally trustworthy.
ST4: the product/brand’s concerns about sustainability meet my expectations.
ST5: the product/brand keeps promises and commitments regarding sustainability.
Chen and Chang (2012)
Intention to purchase (IP) IP1: I intend to purchase sustainable products/brands, because of their sustainability concerns.
IP2: I expect to purchase sustainable products/brands in the near future.
IP3: I avoid buying products/brands that are potentially unsustainable.
IP4: Overall, I am glad to purchase sustainable products/brands, because they are sustainable.
IP5: When I have to choose between two similar products/brands, I choose the one that is more sustainable.
IP6: I will not consider sustainability-related issues when making a purchase.
Chen and Chang (2012)